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Ph.D thesis on "Conversational Analysis of Chatroom 'talk'"

Abstract for PhD ODAM

Masters thesis: Influence of the World Wide Web on literature

School of Literary and Communication Studies
Deakin University
Geelong
Victoria Australia
Supervisor: Dr Lyn McCredden, Research and Graduate Studies Convenor

Internet site provider - University of South Australia

November 25, 1997

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CONCERNS


FUTURES

Since 1945 the number of printed journals has increased from 7,500 to 140,000 and currently are increasing at the rate of more than one-thousand new journals each year. The number of new book titles published each year has increased from 300,000 to more than 850,000 since 1945. (Gilster p. 126) It is too early to forecast whether the number of new journals and books printed will decline with the use of the Internet. There are already thousands of journals on-line. Some on-line sources have the complete journal and some have just indexes to what is within the journal. The advantage of on-line journals to print journals is the rapid rate information can be retrieved without needing to have many journals to individually shift through. On-line journals will grow in number and most journals will have an on-line edition which the reader will be able to interact with. This interaction will come about by the reader being able to offer opinions and suggestions in response to what is presented.

Future literature will be made up of multiple modes linking texts, sound and movie bits as well as graphics. Literature will become an experience. With the further development of virtual reality we will be able to navigate through text, following sentences and paragraphs over textual mindscapes. The Internet like the printing press makes literature available to more people and on a larger scale than ever possible in the past. Presently hypertext is a one-way avenue, we can hypertext to another site but once within another site we can not link back. Within a few years there should be full hypertext where links can be followed in both directions. There will be editions of literary works that are intended from the start to be only created for the World Wide Web and will never exist in a printed form (Lavagnino)

Every poet or essay writer can now have a world audience . Poets in the past have struggled to get their works out. Charles Reznikoff had to publish his own books until he was in his seventies. Lorien Niedecker lived all her life in a small fishing village in Wisconsin where she scrubbed hospital floors to make a living and was not widely published until the late 1960's. Now we can publish a poem or essay as soon as we write it, we can even write it and edit it live on the Internet with the potential tens of millions of viewers watching us write. As I have done with this thesis. Of course these millions of viewers are only potential. Having had the personal experience of creating hundreds of web sites, and promoting them through the various search engines and what's-new sites, I have found that only a few sites registered more than a few hits a week. And those sites were because I put the words erotic in the title which is what the search engines display of a web site. Though for a month (September 1996, when this site registered 35,000 hits) my erotic poem of the month received over a thousand hits a day, then starting the next month it went back to a few dozen a day. I have no idea why that happened, obviously it was written up somewhere as a site to visit. I have lost interest in poems of the week and of the month and no longer up-date them, but the availability of the internet for poems and stories is always there.

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CONCLUSION

"(c)" Terrell Adsit-Neuage. Hackham South Australia October 1997

"(c)" Terrell Adsit-Neuage. Hackham South Australia October 1997

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